Bernice Hansen

Filed under: People, , ,

Full Name:

Bernice Edna Hansell

Occupation / Title:

,

Date of birth:

07/11/1897

Date of death:

04/16/1981

Birthplace:

Los Angeles, California

Biography


Miscredited as Bernice Hansell in a variety of animated cartoon through the golden age, Bernice Edna Hansell was a voice actress known for her squealing voice in countless cartoons of the 1930′s, providing the squeaks for Mickey Mouse, small children and animals. Due to the lack of screen credits during the 30′s, historians have had to make approximations about voice actors, and Hansell has been incorrectly been attributed to the voice of Sniffles. 

Family and early life


Born in California, on July 11th, 1897, Hansell’s father was an Englishman who immigrated to America in 1877, meeting her mother in Iowa. Growing up during the depression era, Hansell found work as a stenographer, and later as a dressmaker for Warner Bros. Studios. 

Career outline


Although Bernice had a relatively short career in animation history, from 1935-1940, she provided many cutesy and baby-like voices for Warner Bros. as well as Water Lantz Studios. The voice of Petunia Pig, Pinky Pig, Tommy Cat, Little Kitty, Cookie and Buddy’s girlfriend in the Buddy cartoons, Hansell was known for her highly feminine , high-pitched and youthful sounding voice in a variety of Elmer Fudd, Porky Pig, Walter Lantz’ Cartune Special and Merrie Melodies cartoons. 

There is a reference in a newspaper to Bernice Hansell in the United Press in 1934, stating that she was sueing Charles Miller for battery, due to a dispute over a dressmaking bill for his wife – and also referencing Hansell as the source of Mickey Mouse’s voice. 

Personal style


“When I introduced a new character for his first appearance, “Porky’s Naughty Nephew” (1938), I asked Bernice (Hansell) in to do the voice. The thing that struck me about her was the great incredulity of her appearance as to her voice. A middle-aged bleached blonde with that pure baby voice. In fact, as I recall, her normal speaking voice was very little removed from the voice she did for me on the sound track,” Bob Clampett 1972.

Filmography


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References:


  • http://cartoonresearch.com/index.php/animation-anecdotes-153/


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